Nigel Purvis

Nigel Purvis is an American diplomat, business and non-profit executive, think tank scholar and international lawyer. Over three decades, Nigel has shaped U.S. and global policy while serving in decision-making roles at a wide variety of globally influential organizations in Washington, DC.

Nigel is the founding CEO of Climate Advisers, a consultancy dedicated to raising climate ambition, catalyzing action, and improving lives. Climate Advisers specializes in U.S. climate policy, international climate diplomacy, carbon markets, and climate communications. It is a global leader on climate-related forest conservation and other nature-based solutions.

Nigel served previously as a U.S. Diplomat, including most recently as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans, Environment, and Science. In that role he directed U.S. foreign policy relating to climate change, biodiversity conservation, forests, and ozone, among other issues.

Nigel also served as senior policy adviser to the Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs and as a treaty negotiator in the Office of the Legal Adviser.

After leaving government, Nigel spent a decade as a senior scholar in major think thanks and advocacy organizations. He was Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and an International Affairs Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He was also a non-resident fellow at Resources for the Future and the German Marshall Fund of the United States. Nigel also served as Vice President for Policy and External Affairs at the Nature Conservancy, the world’s largest nature conservation group. Nigel also was a senior adviser on climate diplomacy to the Obama-Biden campaign and Executive Director of the U.S. Commission on Climate & Tropical Forests.

At the beginning of his career, Nigel worked as a securities attorney in New York at the law firm of Sullivan & Cromwell. He is a prize-winning honors graduate of Harvard Law School and the University of Minnesota, and recipient of the national Harry S Truman scholarship.

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